Sunday, August 1, 2010

I hear the music daylight disc

All the cool kids are getting into Orb photography these days. Of course it's easy now with your digital cameras and your flash. Back in our day we had to muck around with lens flares and darkroom chemicals and infra-red film to get decent results.

Trevor J. Constable explains all about the invisible etheric / plasmatic life-forms that inhabit our skies in his books "They Live in the Sky" and "The Cosmic Pulse of Life".

The local library allegedly has a copy of the latter, which I haven't read for three or four decades. It should provide the finishing touch for my petition to the appropriate UN authorities, to have Orbs declared a NZ Cultural Treasure (or 'Taonga' as we say in moments of multi-culturalism). T. J. Constable is New Zealand-born, you see,* so we have sound legal grounds for claiming intellectual property rights on the Orb photography.**

If you hear no more from me, you'll know that my attempt to borrow the library's copy went very wrong, perhaps because I alerted the Men in Black by searching the catalogue.

* As is Bruce Cathie.

** Constable is not a single-issue writer; he's written some well-received books on WWII aviation history. He is also an expert on cloud-busting and smog dispersal using Reichian orgone projectors, for which he really deserves to feature in his own Kate Bush song.
Sadly, he has not received the recognition he deserves from UFO enthusiasts, some of whom regard him as a 'crackpot' and a 'proponent of the weird theory that UFOs are not at all extraterrestrial spacecraft' who is bringing the whole field into disrepute.

17 comments:

J— said...

my petition to the appropriate UN authorities, to have Orbs declared a NZ Cultural Treasure (or 'Taonga' as we say in moments of multi-culturalism)

Movable heritage, I assume, although that may stretch UNESCO's understanding of the term.

mikey said...

MMMmmm.

Spinach nucleoli in a simple tomato/garlic/basil sauce with coarse ground black pepper and plenty of fresh Parmesan grated on top. Then a nice cup of tea and 100mg of Microdol and it's time for bed...

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© said...

These invisible creatures he called "Sky Critters" and that they live in the atmosphere. Constable claimed to have captured both types of UFO on film, while working with James Woods during the 1950's and 60's.

How much moar proof do you need, sheeples?
~

Smut Clyde said...

Intangible heritage. Very intangible.

merc said...

Culture is a MOAB.

tigris said...

Pfft, back in your day you had to press sharpened reed ends into wet clay.

Smut Clyde said...

Tablet VII of The Tablets is clearly a report of an Orb observation.

Another Kiwi said...

Oh! those tablets! Yes I have one every night with food. Turns my pee orange but no more kaolin deficiencies here.

Big Bad Bald Bastard said...

Of course it's easy now with your digital cameras and your flash.

It's even easier with parascientific knowledge and psionic hardware.

merc said...

I use a wet clay tablet and fire to press into the faces of those i wish to photograph at night.

ownbani, self abnegation

Another Kiwi said...

How, and I ask the question with the full knowledge that there's quite a lot of shit I don't understand, is the invisible UFO inna photo and looks like a potato???

Smut Clyde said...

is the invisible UFO inna photo and looks like a potato

That's the one. You or I might think it resembled a standard lens flare from internal reflections within an uncoated Summar 50mm lens, outlined by the 12-blade iris, with some diffraction fringes around the edge of the iris and internal ones from dust particles on the lens -- much as you might expect from pointing an old camera straight up into the sky at sunrise so direct sunlight can just graze the lens surface. But Constable was not fooled by these feeble stories.

Another Kiwi said...

Pish posh to that story, I say

merc said...

It's a potato print.

icsne, everywhere

Another Kiwi said...

Potato prints are the best kind.

merc said...

Genuine pre diaspora Irish prints sell for, erm, not as much as Bansky actually.

Smut Clyde said...

internal reflections within an uncoated Summar 50mm lens

Come to think of it, looking at the dates it was more likely that he was using a Summitar F2 lens, one of the early ones before Leica switched over to making them with a 6-bladed iris diaphragm in about 1950.